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« Break Into a Clique at Work | Main | Reduce Your Team's Dependence on You »

August 02, 2011

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This is excellent advice. The plan for how a job seeker can break into a health or technical career is certainly encouraging. Just by being at a job, paid or intern, in the field, a person would find out what one or two classes might give him a leg up over other applicants without having to complete an entire school program.
Also, the health industry includes all sorts of jobs, including plenty where no science skills are needed. Their clerical jobs, etc. are growing, too. In a down job market, here's a ray of hope if a person is willing to take a new direction.

I'm Ready to Start working I just Know It's Going to be Exciting.

it's hard to believe you get paid to write such tripe!
You should consider a new career

great blog post. I am reposting on our Twitter feed @jpatrickjobs

speaking of high demand, high tech jobs are in huge demand and we have over 150 of them to peruse through... want more info, please check out our web site http://www.jpatrick.com.

lets get straight to the point i need a job right now,

Don't be fooled by BLS stats. It's years between collection and publication date. Worse, much of its data is provided by self-serving professional organizations, who want more members and thus paint a rosier job picture than is real.

Besides, most of TODAY'S health care job openings are very low-pay. Yes, a decade ago, there was a shortage of garden-variety RNs, physical therapists, etc., but no longer. Indeed.com, which aggregates 5 million jobs, reports that while health care jobs are up 8% over a year ago, the vast majority are of the near-minimum-wage variety: medical assistant (the one who weighs you in the MD's office), phlebotomist (takes your blood) patient technician (wheels you into the operating room), etc. Most of the RN openings are for experienced specialists, e.g., in eICU, neurosurgery, etc, or are part-time/per-diem gigs.

@Marty: An interesting perspective, though anecdotally I've observed the market for new RNs and PAs to be extremely strong at the moment.

@Jason: Okay, what's your plan?

@Kit: Any suggestions?

@Elissa: I agree, and thanks for the resource.

@Hassan: You, go!

@Gail: These are fantastic suggestions. Cheers to your comment being right next to the post!

My passion has been to help pelope declutter. I love to teach organization. But your good point was my need to do so and why. This is the layer of need I want to work on and find out what it is I really am suppose to be doing.Any help would be appreciated?

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